December 9, 2021

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Canada and the United States urge their citizens to leave Haiti The Most Important News and Analysis of Latin America | DW

The United States and Canada urged their citizens to leave Haiti immediately in separate messages on Thursday (11.11.2021) due to the crisis of violence and insecurity in the Caribbean.

In a recent news release from the US Embassy in Port-au-Prince, he said, “The State Department is urging U.S. citizens to make plans to leave Haiti commercially.

As stated in a post on Twitter, the Canadian government has warned its citizens of the advice to leave the Haitian territory if they find a safe way out.

“There is a severe shortage of fuel needed to operate and provide essential services across the country. If you are in #Haiti, exit if you can safely do so if you do not need your stock,” says a profile dedicated to the warning. Canadians are citizens going abroad.

The U.S. Diplomatic Corps has been very detailed in its communications to “carefully consider the risks” such as traveling to Haiti or staying in the country “in light of the current security situation and infrastructure challenges.”

The embassy warned that it would not be possible to help its citizens leave Haiti if commercial flights were not available.

Wave of violence

In that report, the embassy explains that in addition to security concerns, widespread fuel shortages may limit access to essential services, including access to banks, money transfers, emergency medical care, the Internet, telecommunications and public and private transportation options.

It is one of the most intense waves of violence in Haiti in the last 15 years, which has worsened since the July 7 assassination of President Juanel Mois.

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Armed gangs control many neighborhoods in Port-au-Prince, intimidate people with indiscriminate kidnappings and cause fuel shortages through roadblocks and attacks on truck drivers.

jc (efe, ap, reuters)